Not So Happy Holidays

Back to Article
Back to Article

Not So Happy Holidays

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Coming into this week, I was completely out of ideas for an article. I kept asking around to no avail, trying to find something to write about. That’s when Sunday afternoon I was scrolling through Twitter and kept seeing posts with a negative tone. As I kept swiping, more and more were popping into my timeline. I was confused until I came upon one with a picture and a name, with the phrase “rest in peace” ending the post. I didn’t really know this girl, so I asked my brother who graduated in her class and knew her pretty well to get me some more info. Within the hour I had my information. This girl who I barely knew had committed suicide earlier that morning, and it ripped a tear through the whole class of 2016 and beyond.

For the sake of the family’s privacy, I will not disclose her name, but just know that she was one of the most positive people you would ever meet. Even if you didn’t know her, you would’ve heard of her infectious smile or her constant cheer. Many will agree, she was the last person you would’ve ever expected to do something like this. But this article isn’t an obituary or eulogy, it’s about the bigger picture. So what’s next?

Mental health is often referred to as overlooked and forgotten, with a stigma of weakness surrounding it. I can’t explain how opposite that is to the truth. The reality is that mental health is a true disease that results from a chemical imbalance in the brain, and it is nothing to be ashamed of. In fact, you’re not alone by any stretch. There’s a very prominent study by Psychology Today concluding that the average high school student today has the same level of anxiety as the average mental patient in the early 1950s. That’s insane, no pun intended. So the real question is, what are we doing to help?

Luckily, the stigma around mental health is slowly but surely being eroded away. As people slowly begin to speak up about it, more and more options are becoming available for treatment. Therapists are becoming cheaper and covered by more insurances in recent years, and most if not all schools have a counselor students can see. Humans are not the only option as well, as emotional support animals (ESAs) are also available to those who need them. Yet we still need to do more. The only way to slow down and eventually stop these horrific events from happening is to keep pushing the envelope. Even in tough times, we need to stick together.

If you or someone you know is in need of help feel free to talk to a trusted adult, counselor, friend, or call 1-800-273-8255.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email